Spiritual Training (Falling in Love with Jesus) Matthew 1:1-17

Posted: January 23, 2017 in Book of Matthew, Chapter 1:1-17, Falling in Love with Jesus, honor, Uncategorized

Falling in Love with Jesus

When we fall in love, we want to spend time with the object of our affection and willingly give our attention to the relationship. Falling in love with Jesus should be no different, but believers often hurry through Bible reading and prayer. The result is a superficial faith kept alive by habit rather than worship. To attain lasting intimacy, we must approach God with a sense of purpose and determination.

Purpose. “Now set your heart and your soul to seek the lord your God,” King David advised the leaders of Israel (1 Chron. 22:19). Believers must choose whether to pursue God or chase after idols. If we desire intimacy with Him, it is necessary for us to approach the spiritual disciplines purposefully. Before opening Scripture, ask the Lord what He wants to say to you. Pray to understand His ways—He loves answering that request. And enter church with the intention of taking home a new truth from the Lord.

Determination. “Indeed, my spirit within me seeks You diligently,” Isaiah told Yahweh (Isa. 26:9). But even when we do not feel like putting time into our relationship with Christ, we must determine to do so. A revelation from God won’t come every day, but a believer need not despair. Those who diligently seek the Savior experience His presence frequently in their worship.

Getting to know Jesus brings pure joy into a believer’s life. However, we must be willing to offer Him prime time, not our leftover minutes. Giving God attention and spending time with Him is one way to show Him we love Him. God gives us His best; we should put forth no less in return.

When I first gave my life to Christ, I was standing up in Church with all the rest saying I love you Lord.  After a while, I was not feeling Jesus.  So one day I told the Lord that I really don’t love you, but help me to get to know you better so I can’t truly Love you.  I always knew He existed, but I was just not feeling Jesus. 

God lead me to read the 4 books of the Gospel to get to know His Son.  That is when I started to Fall in Love with Jesus.  So, my next study is the Book of Mathew.  I need to take my Love for Jesus deeper and rekindle my Love for Him. 

Mathews 1:1-6

Introduction to Mathew:  AS the motorcade slowly winds through the city, thousands pack the sidewalks hoping to catch a glimpse. Marching bands with great fanfare announce the arrival, and protective agents scan the crowd and run alongside the limousine. Pomp, ceremony, protocol—modern symbols of position and evidences of importance—herald the arrival of a head of state. Whether they are leaders by birth or election, we honor and respect them.

The Jews waited for a leader who had been promised centuries before by prophets. They believed that this leader—the Messiah (“anointed one”)—would rescue them from their Roman oppressors and establish a new kingdom. As their king, he would rule the world with justice. Many Jews, however, overlooked prophecies that also spoke of this king as a suffering servant who would be rejected and killed. It is no wonder, then, that few recognized Jesus as the Messiah. How could this humble carpenter’s son from Nazareth be their king? But Jesus was and is the King of all the earth!

Matthew (Levi) was one of Jesus’ 12 disciples. Once he was a despised tax collector, but his life was changed by this man from Galilee. Matthew wrote this Gospel to his fellow Jews to prove that Jesus is the Messiah and to explain God’s Kingdom.

Matthew begins his account by giving Jesus’ genealogy. He then tells of Jesus’ birth and early years, including the family’s escape to Egypt from the murderous Herod and their return to Nazareth. Following Jesus’ baptism by John (3:16-17) and his defeat of Satan in the wilderness, Jesus began his public ministry by calling his first disciples and giving the Sermon on the Mount (chapters 5–7). Matthew shows Christ’s authority by reporting his miracles of healing the sick and the demon-possessed, and even raising the dead.     Despite opposition from the Pharisees and others in the religious establishment (chapters 12–15), Jesus continued to teach concerning the Kingdom of Heaven (chapters 16–20). During this time, Jesus spoke with his disciples about his imminent death and resurrection (16:21) and revealed his true identity to Peter, James, and John (17:1–5). Near the end of his ministry, Jesus entered Jerusalem in a triumphant procession (21:1-11). But soon opposition mounted, and Jesus knew that his death was near. So he taught his disciples about the future—what they could expect before his return (chapter 24) and how to live until then (chapter 25).

In Matthew’s finale (chapters 26–28), he focuses on Jesus’ final days on earth—the Last Supper, his prayer in Gethsemane, the betrayal by Judas, the flight of the disciples, Peter’s denial, the trials before Caiaphas and Pilate, Jesus’ final words on the cross, and his burial in a borrowed tomb. But the story does not end there, for the Messiah rose from the dead—conquering death and then telling his followers to continue his work by making disciples in all nations.

As you read this Gospel, listen to Matthew’s clear message: Jesus is the Christ, the King of kings and Lord of lords. Celebrate his victory over evil and death, and make Jesus the Lord of your life.

Under Gods Command

Mathews 1:1-6

    1This is the genealogy of Jesus the Messiah the son of David, the son of Abraham:  2Abraham was the father of Isaac,

     Isaac the father of Jacob,

     Jacob the father of Judah and his brothers,

    3Judah the father of Perez and Zerah, whose mother was Tamar,

     Perez the father of Hezron,

     Hezron the father of Ram,

    4Ram the father of Amminadab,

     Amminadab the father of Nahshon,

     Nahshon the father of Salmon,

    5Salmon the father of Boaz, whose mother was Rahab,

    Boaz the father of Obed, whose mother was Ruth,

     Obed the father of Jesse,

    6and Jesse the father of King David.

   David was the father of Solomon, whose mother had been Uriah’s wife,

   7Solomon the father of Rehoboam,

    Rehoboam the father of Abijah,

     Abijah the father of Asa,

    8Asa the father of Jehoshaphat,

     Jehoshaphat the father of Jehoram,

     Jehoram the father of Uzziah,

    9Uzziah the father of Jotham,

     Jotham the father of Ahaz,

     Ahaz the father of Hezekiah,

   10Hezekiah the father of Manasseh,

     Manasseh the father of Amon,

     Amon the father of Josiah,

   11and Josiah the father of Jeconiah and his brothers at the time of the exile to Babylon.

   12After the exile to Babylon:

     Jeconiah was the father of Shealtiel,

     Shealtiel the father of Zerubbabel,

   13Zerubbabel the father of Abihud,

     Abihud the father of Eliakim,

     Eliakim the father of Azor,

   14Azor the father of Zadok,

     Zadok the father of Akim,

     Akim the father of Elihud,

   15Elihud the father of Eleazar,

     Eleazar the father of Matthan,

     Matthan the father of Jacob,

   16and Jacob the father of Joseph, the husband of Mary, and Mary was the mother of Jesus who is called the Messiah.

     17Thus there were fourteen generations in all from Abraham to David, fourteen from David to the exile to Babylon, and fourteen from the exile to the Messiah.

In the first 17 verses we meet 46 people whose lifetimes span 2,000 years. All were ancestors of Jesus, but they varied considerably in personality, spirituality, and experience. Some were heroes of faith—like Abraham, Isaac, Ruth, and David. Some had shady reputations—like Rahab and Tamar. Many were very ordinary—like Hezron, Ram, Nahshon, and Akim. And others were evil—like Manasseh and Abijah. God’s work in history is not limited by human failures or sins, and he works through ordinary people. Just as God used all kinds of people to bring his Son into the world, he uses all kinds today to accomplish his will. And God wants to use you.

Because Mary was a virgin when she became pregnant, Matthew lists Joseph only as the husband of Mary, not the father of Jesus. Matthew’s genealogy gives Jesus’ legal (or royal) lineage through Joseph. Mary’s ancestral line is recorded in Luke 3:23-38. Both Mary and Joseph were direct descendants of David.     Matthew traced the genealogy back to Abraham, while Luke traced it back to Adam. Matthew wrote to the Jews, so Jesus was shown as a descendant of their father, Abraham. Luke wrote to the Gentiles, so he emphasized Jesus as the Savior of all people. 1:17 Matthew breaks Israel’s history into three sets of 14 generations, but there were probably more generations than those listed here. Genealogies often compressed history, meaning that not every generation of ancestors was specifically listed. Thus, the phrase “the father of” can also be translated “the ancestor of.”

Matthew’s inclusion of four particular women (Tamar, Rahab, Ruth, and Bathsheba—here called “Uriah’s wife”) reveals his concern to do more than relay historical data. These women raise both ethnic and ethical questions. At least two of them were not Israelites by birth and all four of them had reputations that could have made them unmentionable in an ancestral tree. Yet this was the line into which God’s Son was born. Jesus’ genealogy makes it clear, not that there were a few disreputable people in his family, but that all of them were sinners.

Lets Bring it Home: God sent his Son as Savior of all people—Jews, Gentiles, men, and women. No matter what the sins of the people, God’s plan was never thwarted. It continues to unfold. That plan includes us.

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