Archive for the ‘Bible’ Category


Under Gods Command

2nd Samuel 5:13-25

David Conquers Jerusalem

        13After he left Hebron, David took more concubines and wives in Jerusalem, and more sons and daughters were born to him. 14These are the names of the children born to him there: Shammua, Shobab, Nathan, Solomon, 15Ibhar, Elishua, Nepheg, Japhia, 16Elishama, Eliada and Eliphelet.

    17When the Philistines heard that David had been anointed king over Israel, they went up in full force to search for him, but David heard about it and went down to the stronghold. 18Now the Philistines had come and spread out in the Valley of Rephaim; 19so David inquired of the LORD, “Shall I go and attack the Philistines? Will you deliver them into my hands?”

    The LORD answered him, “Go, for I will surely deliver the Philistines into your hands.”

    20So David went to Baal Perazim, and there he defeated them. He said, “As waters break out, the LORD has broken out against my enemies before me.” So that place was called Baal Perazim. 21The Philistines abandoned their idols there, and David and his men carried them off.

    22Once more the Philistines came up and spread out in the Valley of Rephaim; 23so David inquired of the LORD, and he answered, “Do not go straight up, but circle around behind them and attack them in front of the poplar trees. 24As soon as you hear the sound of marching in the tops of the poplar trees, move quickly, because that will mean the LORD has gone out in front of you to strike the Philistine army.” 25So David did as the LORD commanded him, and he struck down the Philistines all the way from Gibeona to Gezer.

Although David sincerely sought after God, he had weaknesses like any other person. One of those weaknesses was his desire for many wives. Sadly, the children born to these wives caused David and the kingdom much grief. David also set an unhealthy pattern for his son Solomon.

The “stronghold” is the mountain stronghold in the Desert of Judah that David used when defending himself against Saul (see 23:14 and 1 Chronicles 12:8).

The Philistine oppression of Israel had begun in the days of Samson (Judges 13–16). The Philistines were still Israel’s most powerful enemy although David was once considered a friend and ally (1 Samuel 27; 29). Because they occupied much of Israel’s northern territory, they apparently did not bother David while he was king of Judah to the south. But when they learned that David was planning to unite all Israel, they tried to stop him.

How could David get such a clear message from God? He may have prayed and been urged to action by the Holy Spirit. He may have asked God through a prophet. Most likely, however, he went to the high priest, who consulted God through the Urim and Thummim, which God had told the Israelites to use for just such a purpose.

David fought his battles the way God instructed him. In each instance he

(1) asked if he should fight or not,

(2) followed instructions carefully, and

(3) gave God the glory.

 

We can err in our “battles” by ignoring these steps and instead:

(1) do what we want without considering God’s will,

(2) do things our way and ignore advice in the Bible or from other wise people, and (3) take the glory ourselves or give it to someone else without acknowledging the help we received from God.

All these responses are sinful.

5:25 After David became king, his first order of business was to subdue his enemies—a task the nation had failed to complete when they first entered the land (Judges 2:1-4). David knew this had to be done in order to

(1) protect the nation,

(2) unify the kingdom, and

(3) prepare for building the temple (which would unify religion under God and help abolish idolatrous influences).

The one thing that I truly admire about David is the fact that he prays to the LORD before making a military attack. In this case, when he prays to the LORD, the LORD tells David that He will give these Philistines to him. David will go against them and David will win. 

Lets Bring it Home: When we go into issues, spiritual battles or any other kind of adverse situations, do you go to God first, or do you wait until your plan fails, then seek God.  

We need to slow our roll and seek God first, even something that seems so small, because it’s always those small things that turn out to be the biggest problems.

 


Under Gods Command 

Proverbs 7:14 I have peace offerings with me; this day have I payed my vows.

Whores can be religious. They can even be found at church. Here Solomon described a strange woman – a whore, prostitute, or adulteress. She seduced her young victim by telling him of her religious activities: she was a good woman with high standards, including religious attendance; and she had the best of her sacrifices to share with him.

Peace offerings were split between worshipper and priest. Since the sacrificed item was perfect, the food resulting from it was of the highest quality (Pr 17:1; Lev 3:6; 22:21). It could have been equivalent to USDA Prime+. The part remaining with the worshipper was often shared with friends or used for feasts (Lev 7:15-16; 19:5-6; Deut 12:6-7).

Peace offerings were voluntary offerings to give thanks or pay vows (Lev 19:5). Even a whore can have a form of religion, which serves her selfish goals. It may sooth remains of her vexed conscience; it may disguise her immoral life with a show of religion; and it may assist her seduction of a virtuous young man (Pr 6:26). Or it may serve all three!

The strange woman in Solomon’s extended parable was no common street slut. She was a fine woman with financial means, of noble reputation, and good taste. She offered to share a joyful religious celebration with the young man. The Preacher did his best to warn his son that a whore may change conduct to seduce careful young men (Pr 5:6; Ec 7:26).

Here is a powerful seductress – an elegant and fine woman with character and spirituality to enhance her invitation to adultery. Men may fear prostitutes for their cold hearts, obvious financial motive, likelihood of disease, lack of cleanliness, frequent use, legal risk, and impersonal performance. The Preacher knew how to get to the heart of a matter.

What a fine invitation! She had no ulterior financial motive, for she provided the fare. She was a sensitive and sincere woman well received in the better circles of her city. She had much fine food, and her only ambition appeared a need for company. “Come,” she said, “I need you to complete this wonderful day and enjoy life’s fine things with me.”

Young man! Wake up! Open your eyes! Behind her invitation is a snare to take you down to death and hell (Pr 7:27). Once in the hold of her lascivious arms and under the spell of her flattering lips, you are lost without hope of recovery (Pr 5:22; 22:14; 23:27). Stay away! There are some temptations you can fight, but this temptation you must flee!

A form of religion to cover intentional sin compounds the crime (Pr 21:27). Rome offers many flattering pretensions of religion, but she is the great whore and mother of harlots and abominations of the earth (Rev 17:1-6), which has used vows of celibacy and poverty, both of which are contrary to the Bible, to defraud and destroy many. Beware!