Under Gods Command

Proverbs 28:11 – A rich man may be wise in his own eyes, but a poor man who has discernment sees through him.

Rich people often think they are wonderful; depending on no one, they take credit for all they do. But that’s a hollow self-esteem. Through dependence on God in their struggles, the poor may develop a richness of spirit that no amount of wealth can provide. The rich person can lose all his material wealth, while no one can take away the poor person’s character. Don’t be jealous of the rich; money may be all they will ever have.

Riches and success can be blinding. They cause pride leading a man to think foolishly. A poor man with wisdom can see the rich man’s errors and prove he is wrong. It is better to be poor with wisdom than rich without it. Buy wisdom today, and never sell it (Pr 23:23).

Results prove very little, for many contrary factors often contribute to the end result. A man with understanding, no matter how poor, can dissect and condemn a rich fool. Wisdom is the principle thing for you to get, and it includes sober skepticism of all ideas, regardless of the accomplishments, wealth, or popularity of the source of those ideas.

Riches and success cause some men to think they are great or invincible, though God made them as certainly as He made their poor neighbors (Pr 18:11; 10:15). They must put on their pants the same way, and they generally die about the same age (Pr 22:2).

The rich man in this proverb is a fool – he thinks he is wise by the false value he puts on wealth. He cannot hear the instruction or warnings of wisdom, for he is deaf by a bloated ego from success (Pr 26:16). This makes him worse than a fool (Pr 26:12). He arrogantly assumes he is righteous by his positive results and assumed financial invincibility.

The poor man in this proverb is a wise man – he has understanding. He can look at a rich fool and easily see the vanity of his life. The rich man’s wealth, success, or position does not deceive or distract him. He is able to clearly analyze his actions and identify his errors and sins (Pr 18:17). Prudence and wisdom are not affected by economic status.

Rich men are generally treated reverently, which deceives them into thinking too highly of themselves (Pr 14:20; 19:4). Rich men have many business or financial victories, so they arrogantly conclude they are winners (Pr 18:11). But the poor man, without such blinding influences, is able to discern the flaws and transgressions of the rich man’s life.

Results are deceiving. Moses got water by striking a rock, but God told him to speak to it (Num 20:7-13). You will meet children who seem civilized enough and were never spanked, but their parents are fools (Pr 19:18; 22:15; 23:13-14; 29:15). Men may get rich with speculative ventures built on debt, but they are wrong (Pr 13:23; 20:21; 22:7).

Results are deceiving. Consider them well. What appear to be successes may be God merely using you (Is 10:5-15), the curse of prosperity of fools (Pr 1:32), incredibly temporary (Ps 36:1-2; 50:21), just your limited view of a matter (John 19:15-16), wishful thinking, a placebo effect, or the initial payment of “profits” in a Ponzi scheme! Beware!

Gain is not godliness (I Tim 6:3-5). Godliness with contentment is great gain (I Tim 6:6). This profound wisdom is an essential and valuable rule for life. A poor man with contentment can easily have greater joy and peace than a rich man without it. Christians should be the most content, for they have God as their portion (Heb 13:5-6; Ps 73:25-26).

Do not let riches blind or distort your judgment. Do not envy the wicked for apparent prosperity (Ps 37:1-3; 73:1-24). The truly wise man is able to see past appearances and judge righteous judgment (John 7:24). Never let apparent success in any area ever distract you from “thus saith the Lord,” for that alone is wisdom. The rich shall soon be laid in the grave; death shall feed on them; they cannot redeem anyone from death (Ps 49:6-14).

God chose to save more poor of earth to eternal life than He did of the rich (Matt 19:23-26; I Cor 1:26-29; Jas 2:5). Poor believers should rejoice in this wonderful news (Jas 1:9)! At the moment of death, the rich fool will pass eternally into the bleakest poverty and greatest torment imaginable, but the poor man with faith will pass into unspeakable wealth and pleasure forever. Have you believed on Jesus Christ as your portion in life?


The other day a person told me that if you commit suicide you are going straight to hell.  Of course I asked him to show me that in the Bible, and he said that is what he was told.  I know that bible does not say that, but I dd some research on my own.

In the ancient world, suicide was sometimes accepted as an appropriate response to escape evil, avoid shame, express grief over a tragic death, or avoid capture or dishonor in battle. Overall, however, suicide was condemned. In the Old Testament, there are 6 examples of suicide:

  • Abimelech (Judges 9:54) – to avoid the shame of death at the hands of a woman
  • Samson (Judges 16:28-31) – to defeat those who imprisoned him
  • Saul (1Samuel 31:1-4) – to avoid the dishonor of being captured after he was wounded
  • Saul’s armor-bearer (1Samuel 31:5) – to atone for killing a king
  • Ahitophel (2Samuel 17:23) – in despair over deception being perpetrated around him
  • Zimri (1Kings 16:18) – to avoid capture by the army

The Bible views suicide as equal to murder, which is what it is—self-murder. God is the only one who is to decide when and how a person should die. We should say with the psalmist, “My times are in your hands” (Psalm 31:15).

God is the giver of life. He gives, and He takes away (Job 1:21). Suicide, the taking of one’s own life, is ungodly because it rejects God’s gift of life. No man or woman should presume to take God’s authority upon themselves to end his or her own life.

Some people in Scripture felt deep despair in life. Solomon, in his pursuit of pleasure, reached the point where he “hated life” (Ecclesiastes 2:17). Elijah was fearful and depressed and yearned for death (1 Kings 19:4). Jonah was so angry at God that he wished to die (Jonah 4:8). Even the apostle Paul and his missionary companions at one point “were under great pressure, far beyond our ability to endure, so that we despaired of life itself” (2 Corinthians 1:8).

However, none of these men committed suicide. Solomon learned to “fear God and keep his commandments, for this is the duty of all mankind” (Ecclesiastes 12:13). Elijah was comforted by an angel, allowed to rest, and given a new commission. Jonah received admonition and rebuke from God. Paul learned that, although the pressure he faced was beyond his ability to endure, the Lord can bear all things: “This happened that we might not rely on ourselves but on God, who raises the dead” (2 Corinthians 1:9).

So, according to the Bible, suicide is a sin. It is not the “greatest” sin—it is no worse than other evils, in terms of how God sees it, and it does not determine a person’s eternal destiny. However, suicide definitely has a deep and lasting impact on those left behind. The painful scars left by a suicide do not heal easily. May God grant His grace to each one who is facing trials today (Psalm 67:1). And may each of us take hope in the promise,“Everyone who calls on the name of the Lord will be saved” (Romans 10:13).


Under Gods Command                        

Proverbs 03:21-26   21My son, do not let wisdom and understanding out of your sight, preserve sound judgment and discretion;

22they will be life for you, an ornament to grace your neck.

23Then you will go on your way in safety, and your foot will not stumble.

24When you lie down, you will not be afraid; when you lie down, your sleep will be sweet.

25Have no fear of sudden disaster or of the ruin that overtakes the wicked,

26for the LORD will be at your side and will keep your foot from being snared.

Proverbs 3:21-22 “21My son, do not let wisdom and understanding out of your sight, preserve sound judgment and discretion;

22they will be life for you, an ornament to grace your neck.

True wisdom belongs to God. God will give us wisdom if we seek it prayerfully. The grace that Jesus has provided for us has to be held in high esteem, even to the saving of our soul. We must remain in that wisdom.

Proverbs 3:23 Then you will go on your way in safety, and your foot will not stumble.

If we remain in the wisdom that God hath provided for us in His Son, Jesus Christ, we shall be able to walk in His way and not stumble.

Proverbs 3:24 When you lie down, you will not be afraid; when you lie down, your sleep will be sweet.

Here, again, if we remain in the wisdom that the Lord has given us, there is no fear of death. Death of the body would just transform us into that heavenly place with Jesus. There is no fear for the Christian with faith. So many times in these lessons we have made the statement that fear is the opposite of faith. Sleep is sweet for those wise unto salvation. No regrets haunt us. We have gotten forgiveness and are living just as if we had never sinned: justified by Jesus. Sleep is sweet when everything is alright with you and God.

Proverbs 3:25-26 Have no fear of sudden disaster or of the ruin that overtakes the wicked, 26for the LORD will be at your side and will keep your foot from being snared.

We see many instances in the New Testament when the demon spirits are afraid of Jesus, because they know that He is the Judge of the world and that they have a terrible fate awaiting them.

In Matthew 8:29, “And, behold, they cried out, saying, What have we to do with thee, Jesus, thou Son of God? art thou come hither to torment us before the time?”  You see, sudden fear gripped them, because of the terrible fate they know they have awaiting them. If you know that you are saved and safe with the Lord, you have no sudden fear. The only fear permitted to those who trust in the Lord is Godly fear.  You see, trust in the Lord brings confidence, a knowing that all is well.


Under Gods Command

HATE                                 

I know I am going to get some push back on this one.  I am going to speak about Hate.

Do you know that a person can develop so much hate and dislike for a person that they can no longer see anything good in that person.

President Obma: He was hated by a lot of people due to being a Person of Color, and the first POC President.  All the good he did, people still hated him, and did not see any good in him, or supported him due to their dislike.

President Trump: He is hated and dislike by people due to the negative leadership he is demonstrating in office.

Now, I know in your minds that you are comparing the two, and that’s not even what this is about.  I am talking about the hate and dislike in people’s hearts with the way they felt about these two.

Now remember, I am talking the hate and dislike we develop in our hearts.

Now someone might be saying that Trump is not doing anything good in office.  Someone else might be saying, how could they not like Obama with all the good he did.

Now! There is one more person that I am going to mention who some also did not see any good he was doing, and this Man was perfect, but they were just sitting back waiting for Him to do something wrong.  His name was Jesus Christ.  With all the miracles and preaching he did, the Teachers of the Law, chief priest and the elders were still trying to find a way to arrest him (Luke 20:19)

Lets Bring it Home: What I am saying is this.  We as Christians should not let any person to start producing that much dislike or hate in us so we stop seeing the good in a person.  If its skin color, bad leadership or what ever.  We have a God in heaven who looks out for us and is in control of the entire universe.  Yes our government is out of order, and we need to keep praying for results, and praying for our President.  Don’t get so caught up in what the President is doing and overlook your own sins.


Proverbs 7:21With persuasive words she led him astray; she seduced him with her smooth talk. 

Women can overpower men – by words! Men crave hearing a woman’s praise, affection, and loyalty. A whore’s flattery is very dangerous. Wicked women use this power to entice men to sin; virtuous women use it to please, protect, and build up their husbands.

Solomon’s long parable about an adulteress seducing a young fool includes the power of her words tempting him to sin with her. Her speech is so powerful, she “caused him to yield” and “forced him” into sexual sin. He is fully guilty for sinning with her, but the wisdom of this proverb is to rightly grasp the danger and power of her flirting words.

In this perverse world, no matter how a woman dresses or acts, it is always the man’s fault for sexual problems. Sexual harassment occurs in only one direction for such weak minds and today’s courts. But the LORD and Solomon warned about women seducing and forcing men, and they were right. Women have power (Pr 6:24-25; 7:26; Eccl 7:26).

Whorish women create more sexual temptation for men than lewd men do for women (Pr 23:27-28). Only the basest of women are attracted to crude, forward, and lascivious men. Women are naturally protected by stronger inhibitions, need for commitment, families, laws, and social decorum. But what can protect men from a bold seductress? Proverbs!

Flattery is excessive praise used to seduce someone against his will. It is presenting a matter very favorably in order to make it more pleasant and to beguile the listener. Men love the praise of a woman, for winning the adoration, favor, and devotion of a woman is an instinctive drive placed in their hearts and loins by God. Evil women manipulate this desire in men to prey on them in their various schemes of seduction for selfish purposes.

Whatever inhibitions against sexual sin a man has – by religion, parental training, or noble character – he will often lose them due to the enticing and flattering speech of a desirable woman. The adoration of a woman is an elixir that only a few exceptional men can resist, and then only by the grace of God. Joseph may have resisted Potiphar’s wife, but he was an exception to the general rule of Scripture and human experience.

King Solomon often warned his son about the smooth and silky words of a whorish seductress (Pr 2:16; 5:3; 6:24; 7:5; 22:14). Wise men will take sober heed and avoid such women, before their lying words steal their souls and virtue. But here he has just described in detail the verbal approach of an adulteress enticing a naïve victim (Pr 7:13-20). His summary in this proverb states the case well. She forced the young man to yield!

Solomon described the whore as using an embrace, a kiss, and a bold, uninhibited face before her words (Pr 7:13). Then he gave a lengthy description of her much fair speech:

  1. I am really a good girl: I am no whore: sleeping with me will not be sin (7:14).
  2. I have made many preparations and have lots of things for a great time (7:14).
  3. My motives are very noble in wanting to share a great time with you (7:15).
  4. I have waited a long time and dreamed often of finding a man like you (7:15).
  5. I am so glad I found you, because I do not want to be with anyone else (7:15).
  6. It is so wonderful to be alone with you and feel the passion between us (7:15).
  7. I have wanted to meet you for a long time; I have made preparations (7:16).
  8. I have arranged things for the ultimate, perfect lovemaking between us (7:16).
  9. I know special things you will love, that other boring women overlook (7:17).
  10. I care about you more than any other woman, so I go to greater efforts (7:17).
  11. We surely have a love between us that no one else has ever had before (7:18).
  12. Let us fully experience the depths of this unique, special love we have (7:18).
  13. No woman has ever felt as strongly about any man as I feel for you (7:18).
  14. Our lovemaking will exceed all the lovemaking in the world’s history (7:18).
  15. The comfort and pleasure we can find in each other will be wonderful (7:18).
  16. Our love and pleasure will last all night – and all our lives – forever (7:18).
  17. Don’t worry about any risk, for my old man is on a long business trip (7:19).
  18. He loves business more than me: I need your love and body so much (7:19).
  19. There is no risk of getting caught; I have figured everything out for us (7:20).
  20. He has money, which he loves; we have a love his money cannot buy (7:20).

Young man, how strong was Samson? Was he stronger than any man? Indeed! He was stronger than you. But whores have slain many strong men (Pr 7:26). Delilah used words to destroy him, even though he knew she wanted to destroy him. Why could he not resist her? Because flattering words from a beautiful woman are too much for most men! Read about his weakness and helplessness before her manipulating flattery (Judges 16:4-21).

Young man, how wise was Solomon? Was he wiser than any man? Indeed! He was wiser than you. But whores have cast down and wounded many great men (Pr 7:26). Exotic women caused even Solomon to sin, against the good advice of his own proverbs (I Kgs 11:1-8; Neh 13:26). Among many nations there was no king like him, and God loved Him, but these women corrupted his great character by power over him (Eccl 7:26).

In avoiding the dangerous flattery of women, you must also guard against seducing words in notes, cards, emails, text messages, tweets, phone messages, letters, forums, or any other forms of communication. It does not matter how a woman’s words arrive in a man’s mind, they are powerful. She can communicate with you more easily today than ever before, and wisdom demands caution in all these new dangers of the 21st century.

Christian woman, guard your speech to men other than your father or husband. Be sober. Hate flirting or flattery. While praise is a wonderful thing, it is too powerful for you to give to men other than on rare occasions and with great discretion. But you should learn to use kind words and feminine adoration of your father and husband, for it can build a man’s soul and character to be the strong and noble creature God intended him to be.

Christian wife, why let the world’s women tempt your husband by your silence or prudery at home? A virtuous wife is skilful in all the arts of lovemaking (Pr 5:19; I Cor 7:1-5; Heb 13:4), including words that comfort, intrigue, arouse, and invite her husband. If you have not been taught such things, you need to read King Solomon’s Song! The book of Proverbs has lessons of wisdom, but his song describes two hot married lovers!

The subtle and damning nature of flattery is seen also in false religion, where good words and fair speeches deceive the hearts of simple hearers to sell false doctrine (Rom 16:17-18; II Cor 2:17; 11:3-4,13-15; Col 2:4; II Pet 2:3,18). What is the protection? Look for the plain and simple churches of Jesus Christ with straightforward preaching of the Bible. Look for ministers who provide all things direct and honest (II Cor 4:2). Instead of pulpit manner, look for pulpit content. Instead of presentation, look for doctrine and instruction.


The Sins of the Government have not yet reached its full measure

Genesis 15:16 In the fourth generation your descendants will come back here, for the sin of the Amorites has not yet reached its full measure

15:16 The Amorites were one of the nations living in Canaan, the land God promised Abram. God knew the people would grow more wicked and would someday need to be punished. Part of that punishment would involve taking away their land and giving it to Abram’s descendants. God in his mercy was giving the Amorites plenty of time to repent, but he already knew they would not. At the right time, they would have to be punished. Everything God does is true to his character. He is merciful, knows all, and acts justly—and his timing is perfect.

Let’s Bring it Home: Today we have a Government that is not doing right by the people, nor God and a President that continues to lead this country by creating issues every day.  We hear some say he needs to resign, some say he needs to be impeach. and others just say he needs to go.  It seems like every week or month it’s something new.  As the Amorites did not reach their full measure of doing evil, I believe President Trump has not reach his full measure, and God is giving him time to get it right and to repent of his sins or evil doings.  Keep praying for President Trump and our Government, because you can best believe the last two sentences above.  Everything God does is true to his character.  He is merciful, knows all, and acts justly, and his timing is perfect.


Under Gods Command (Falling in Love with Jesus)

Matthew Chapter 1:18-24    

18This is how the birth of Jesus the Messiah came about: His mother Mary was pledged to be married to Joseph, but before they came together, she was found to be pregnant through the Holy Spirit. 19Because Joseph her husband was faithful to the law, and yet did not want to expose her to public disgrace, he had in mind to divorce her quietly.

     20But after he had considered this, an angel of the Lord appeared to him in a dreams and said, “Joseph son of David, do not be afraid to take Mary home as your wife, because what is conceived in her is from the Holy Spirit. 21She will give birth to a son, and you are to give him the name Jesus, t because he will save his people from their sins.”

     22All this took place to fulfill what the Lord had said through the prophet: 23“The virgin will conceive and give birth to a son, and they will call him Immanuel” w (which means “God with us”).

     24When Joseph woke up, he did what the angel of the Lord had commanded him and took Mary home as his wife. 25But he did not consummate their marriage until she gave birth to a son. And he gave him the name Jesus.

Jewish marriage involved three basic steps. First, the two families agreed to the union. Second, a public announcement was made. At this point, the couple was “pledged.” This was similar to engagement today except that their relationship could be broken only through death or divorce (even though sexual relations were not yet permitted). Third, the couple was married and began living together. Because Mary and Joseph were engaged, Mary’s apparent unfaithfulness carried a severe social stigma. According to Jewish civil law, Joseph had a right to divorce her, and the Jewish authorities could have had her stoned to death (Deuteronomy 22:23-24).

1:18 Why is the Virgin Birth important to the Christian faith? Jesus Christ, God’s Son, had to be free from the sinful nature passed on to all other human beings by Adam. Because Jesus was born of a woman, he was a human being; but as the Son of God, Jesus was born without any trace of human sin. Jesus is both fully human and fully divine.

Because Jesus lived as a man, we know that he fully understands our experiences and struggles (Hebrews 4:15-16). Because he is God, he has the power and authority to deliver us from sin (Colossians 2:13-15). We can tell Jesus all our thoughts, feelings, and needs. He has been where we are now, and he has the ability to help.

Joseph was faced with a difficult choice after discovering that Mary was pregnant. Perhaps Joseph thought he had only two options: divorce Mary quietly or have her stoned. But God provided a third option—marry her (1:20-23). In view of the circumstances, this had not occurred to Joseph. But God often shows us that there are more options available than we think. Although Joseph seemed to be doing the right thing by breaking the engagement, only God’s guidance helped him make the best decision. But that did not make it an easy decision. Consenting to marry Mary surely cast doubt on his own innocence regarding the pregnancy, as well as leaving them both with a social stigma they would carry for the rest of their lives. Yet Joseph chose to obey the angel’s command (1:24). When our decisions affect the lives of others, we must always seek God’s wisdom and then be willing to follow through no matter how difficult it may be.

The conception and birth of Jesus Christ are supernatural events beyond human logic or reasoning. Because of this, God sent angels to help certain people understand the significance of what was happening (see 2:13, 19; Luke 1:11, 26; 2:9).

Angels are spiritual beings created by God who help carry out his work on earth. They bring God’s messages to people (Luke 1:26), protect God’s people (Daniel 6:22), offer encouragement (Genesis 16:7-16), give guidance (Exodus 14:19), carry out punishment (2 Samuel 24:16), patrol the earth (Zechariah 1:9-14), and fight the forces of evil (2 Kings 6:16-18; Revelation 20:1-2). There are both good and bad angels (Revelation 12:7), but because bad angels are allied with the devil, or Satan, they have considerably less power and authority than good angels. Eventually the main role of angels will be to offer continuous praise to God (Revelation 7:11-12).

The angel declared to Joseph that Mary’s child was conceived by the Holy Spirit and would be a son. This reveals an important truth about Jesus—he is both God and human. The infinite, unlimited God took on the limitations of humanity so he could live and die for the salvation of all who would believe in him.

Jesus means “the LORD saves.” Jesus came to earth to save us because we can’t save ourselves from sin and its consequences. No matter how good we are, we can’t eliminate the sinful nature present in all of us. Only Jesus can do that. Jesus didn’t come to help people save themselves; he came to be their Savior from the power and penalty of sin. Thank Christ for his death on the cross for your sin, and then ask him to take control of your life. Your new life begins at that moment.

Jesus would fulfill the prophecy of Isaiah, for he would be “Immanuel” (“God with us”; see Isaiah 7:14). Jesus was God in the flesh; thus, God was literally among us, “with us.” Through the Holy Spirit, Christ is present today in the life of every believer. Perhaps not even Isaiah understood how far-reaching the meaning of Immanuel would be. 1:24 Joseph changed his plans quickly after learning that Mary had not been unfaithful to him (1:19). He obeyed God and proceeded with the marriage plans. Although others may have disapproved of his decision, Joseph went ahead with what he knew was right

Lets Bring it Home: Sometimes we avoid doing what is right because of what others might think. Like Joseph, we must choose to obey God rather than seek the approval of others.


Falling in Love with Jesus

When we fall in love, we want to spend time with the object of our affection and willingly give our attention to the relationship. Falling in love with Jesus should be no different, but believers often hurry through Bible reading and prayer. The result is a superficial faith kept alive by habit rather than worship. To attain lasting intimacy, we must approach God with a sense of purpose and determination.

Purpose. “Now set your heart and your soul to seek the lord your God,” King David advised the leaders of Israel (1 Chron. 22:19). Believers must choose whether to pursue God or chase after idols. If we desire intimacy with Him, it is necessary for us to approach the spiritual disciplines purposefully. Before opening Scripture, ask the Lord what He wants to say to you. Pray to understand His ways—He loves answering that request. And enter church with the intention of taking home a new truth from the Lord.

Determination. “Indeed, my spirit within me seeks You diligently,” Isaiah told Yahweh (Isa. 26:9). But even when we do not feel like putting time into our relationship with Christ, we must determine to do so. A revelation from God won’t come every day, but a believer need not despair. Those who diligently seek the Savior experience His presence frequently in their worship.

Getting to know Jesus brings pure joy into a believer’s life. However, we must be willing to offer Him prime time, not our leftover minutes. Giving God attention and spending time with Him is one way to show Him we love Him. God gives us His best; we should put forth no less in return.

When I first gave my life to Christ, I was standing up in Church with all the rest saying I love you Lord.  After a while, I was not feeling Jesus.  So one day I told the Lord that I really don’t love you, but help me to get to know you better so I can’t truly Love you.  I always knew He existed, but I was just not feeling Jesus. 

God lead me to read the 4 books of the Gospel to get to know His Son.  That is when I started to Fall in Love with Jesus.  So, my next study is the Book of Mathew.  I need to take my Love for Jesus deeper and rekindle my Love for Him. 

Mathews 1:1-6

Introduction to Mathew:  AS the motorcade slowly winds through the city, thousands pack the sidewalks hoping to catch a glimpse. Marching bands with great fanfare announce the arrival, and protective agents scan the crowd and run alongside the limousine. Pomp, ceremony, protocol—modern symbols of position and evidences of importance—herald the arrival of a head of state. Whether they are leaders by birth or election, we honor and respect them.

The Jews waited for a leader who had been promised centuries before by prophets. They believed that this leader—the Messiah (“anointed one”)—would rescue them from their Roman oppressors and establish a new kingdom. As their king, he would rule the world with justice. Many Jews, however, overlooked prophecies that also spoke of this king as a suffering servant who would be rejected and killed. It is no wonder, then, that few recognized Jesus as the Messiah. How could this humble carpenter’s son from Nazareth be their king? But Jesus was and is the King of all the earth!

Matthew (Levi) was one of Jesus’ 12 disciples. Once he was a despised tax collector, but his life was changed by this man from Galilee. Matthew wrote this Gospel to his fellow Jews to prove that Jesus is the Messiah and to explain God’s Kingdom.

Matthew begins his account by giving Jesus’ genealogy. He then tells of Jesus’ birth and early years, including the family’s escape to Egypt from the murderous Herod and their return to Nazareth. Following Jesus’ baptism by John (3:16-17) and his defeat of Satan in the wilderness, Jesus began his public ministry by calling his first disciples and giving the Sermon on the Mount (chapters 5–7). Matthew shows Christ’s authority by reporting his miracles of healing the sick and the demon-possessed, and even raising the dead.     Despite opposition from the Pharisees and others in the religious establishment (chapters 12–15), Jesus continued to teach concerning the Kingdom of Heaven (chapters 16–20). During this time, Jesus spoke with his disciples about his imminent death and resurrection (16:21) and revealed his true identity to Peter, James, and John (17:1–5). Near the end of his ministry, Jesus entered Jerusalem in a triumphant procession (21:1-11). But soon opposition mounted, and Jesus knew that his death was near. So he taught his disciples about the future—what they could expect before his return (chapter 24) and how to live until then (chapter 25).

In Matthew’s finale (chapters 26–28), he focuses on Jesus’ final days on earth—the Last Supper, his prayer in Gethsemane, the betrayal by Judas, the flight of the disciples, Peter’s denial, the trials before Caiaphas and Pilate, Jesus’ final words on the cross, and his burial in a borrowed tomb. But the story does not end there, for the Messiah rose from the dead—conquering death and then telling his followers to continue his work by making disciples in all nations.

As you read this Gospel, listen to Matthew’s clear message: Jesus is the Christ, the King of kings and Lord of lords. Celebrate his victory over evil and death, and make Jesus the Lord of your life.

Under Gods Command

Mathews 1:1-6

    1This is the genealogy of Jesus the Messiah the son of David, the son of Abraham:  2Abraham was the father of Isaac,

     Isaac the father of Jacob,

     Jacob the father of Judah and his brothers,

    3Judah the father of Perez and Zerah, whose mother was Tamar,

     Perez the father of Hezron,

     Hezron the father of Ram,

    4Ram the father of Amminadab,

     Amminadab the father of Nahshon,

     Nahshon the father of Salmon,

    5Salmon the father of Boaz, whose mother was Rahab,

    Boaz the father of Obed, whose mother was Ruth,

     Obed the father of Jesse,

    6and Jesse the father of King David.

   David was the father of Solomon, whose mother had been Uriah’s wife,

   7Solomon the father of Rehoboam,

    Rehoboam the father of Abijah,

     Abijah the father of Asa,

    8Asa the father of Jehoshaphat,

     Jehoshaphat the father of Jehoram,

     Jehoram the father of Uzziah,

    9Uzziah the father of Jotham,

     Jotham the father of Ahaz,

     Ahaz the father of Hezekiah,

   10Hezekiah the father of Manasseh,

     Manasseh the father of Amon,

     Amon the father of Josiah,

   11and Josiah the father of Jeconiah and his brothers at the time of the exile to Babylon.

   12After the exile to Babylon:

     Jeconiah was the father of Shealtiel,

     Shealtiel the father of Zerubbabel,

   13Zerubbabel the father of Abihud,

     Abihud the father of Eliakim,

     Eliakim the father of Azor,

   14Azor the father of Zadok,

     Zadok the father of Akim,

     Akim the father of Elihud,

   15Elihud the father of Eleazar,

     Eleazar the father of Matthan,

     Matthan the father of Jacob,

   16and Jacob the father of Joseph, the husband of Mary, and Mary was the mother of Jesus who is called the Messiah.

     17Thus there were fourteen generations in all from Abraham to David, fourteen from David to the exile to Babylon, and fourteen from the exile to the Messiah.

In the first 17 verses we meet 46 people whose lifetimes span 2,000 years. All were ancestors of Jesus, but they varied considerably in personality, spirituality, and experience. Some were heroes of faith—like Abraham, Isaac, Ruth, and David. Some had shady reputations—like Rahab and Tamar. Many were very ordinary—like Hezron, Ram, Nahshon, and Akim. And others were evil—like Manasseh and Abijah. God’s work in history is not limited by human failures or sins, and he works through ordinary people. Just as God used all kinds of people to bring his Son into the world, he uses all kinds today to accomplish his will. And God wants to use you.

Because Mary was a virgin when she became pregnant, Matthew lists Joseph only as the husband of Mary, not the father of Jesus. Matthew’s genealogy gives Jesus’ legal (or royal) lineage through Joseph. Mary’s ancestral line is recorded in Luke 3:23-38. Both Mary and Joseph were direct descendants of David.     Matthew traced the genealogy back to Abraham, while Luke traced it back to Adam. Matthew wrote to the Jews, so Jesus was shown as a descendant of their father, Abraham. Luke wrote to the Gentiles, so he emphasized Jesus as the Savior of all people. 1:17 Matthew breaks Israel’s history into three sets of 14 generations, but there were probably more generations than those listed here. Genealogies often compressed history, meaning that not every generation of ancestors was specifically listed. Thus, the phrase “the father of” can also be translated “the ancestor of.”

Matthew’s inclusion of four particular women (Tamar, Rahab, Ruth, and Bathsheba—here called “Uriah’s wife”) reveals his concern to do more than relay historical data. These women raise both ethnic and ethical questions. At least two of them were not Israelites by birth and all four of them had reputations that could have made them unmentionable in an ancestral tree. Yet this was the line into which God’s Son was born. Jesus’ genealogy makes it clear, not that there were a few disreputable people in his family, but that all of them were sinners.

Lets Bring it Home: God sent his Son as Savior of all people—Jews, Gentiles, men, and women. No matter what the sins of the people, God’s plan was never thwarted. It continues to unfold. That plan includes us.