Archive for the ‘Seeking Wisdom’ Category


We are often confused by the events around us.  Many things we will never understand; others will fall into place in years to come as we look back and see how God was working.  This proverb counsels us not to worry if we don’t understand everything as it happens.  Instead, we should trust that God knows what he’s doing, even if his timing or design is not clear to us. 


Perhaps, this Scripture here about the father indicates that he not only wastes what he gets himself, but talks his dad out of what he has, and wastes his dad’s savings also.

 However, a son can waste his father in more ways than money. A son that will not take advice from his father has wasted all the stored-up knowledge his father could share with him. For this son to chase away his mother has to be something very terrible. Mothers do not give up their sons easily. Whether this literally means chases him out of the home or whether it means his evil deeds have driven her affection away, is awfully bad.

A mother’s love is next to God’s love. This son would certainly be a dishonor to his parents. Shame and reproach would certainly be the aftereffects of this life.

 In this verse, it appears that the son comes into possession of his father’s property during his parents’ lifetime, but rather than caring for them, he drives them out. 


There is a great difference between the person who learns from criticism and the person who refuses to accept correction.  How we respond to criticism determines whether or not we grow in wisdom.  The next time someone criticizes you, listen carefully to all that is said.  You might learn something.


Do you want to be happy and successful? You can be! Here is wisdom to find fulfillment and peace in life: learn to talk better (Pr 18:21). The proverb has many figures of speech, but the lesson is simple. If you will improve your speaking, you will be blessed in many ways by God, by others, and even by your own soul (Pr 14:14). Grasp this wisdom!

Your belly here is your heart, soul, spirit, and conscience (Pr 13:25; 18:8; 20:27,30). They are fulfilled and satisfied, when you speak well (Pr 15:23). The fruit of your mouth is gracious and wise words, which is the good trait of speaking correctly (Pr 16:13; 22:11; 24:26; 25:11). You can give yourself pleasure by noble speech. Kind and good words help listeners for sure, but they also bring rewards to the speaker (Pr 12:14; 13:2).

The increase of your lips in this proverb is the improvement that you make to your speech by learning the rules of wisdom for the tongue and lips (Pr 15:28; 16:23). Solomon had much to say on this subject, and you can increase the sweetness and value of your speech by ruling your words for the glory of God and profit of man. This increase, like the fruit in the first clause, will bring blessing, honor, and riches into your life.

How many times have you later said to yourself, “Why did I say that?” If you have a conscience (all good men have strong consciences), then you have grieved for foolish or hurtful words you let escape from your mouth. It is this frustrating pain in life that you can eliminate by learning gracious speech. Solomon knew the chance of sin increased with much speaking, so he recommended fewer words (Pr 10:19; 17:27-28; Eccl 5:1-3). This saying is wise: If you cannot say anything kind and helpful, then say nothing at all.

How many times have others said, “Why did she say that?” Have you left others bleeding from the piercing of the sword in your mouth (Pr 12:18)? Your tongue is for the health and wealth of others, but you often leave them angered, grieving, or confused. Sometimes they tell you about it; most of the time they just suffer in silence. When you find out the pain and damage you have caused, it is a burden on your soul. It is your wisdom and honor to learn words that encourage and instruct others (Pr 10:20-21; 16:24).

God gave you a tongue for more than swallowing food. He named it your glory (Ps 30:12; 108:1). By proper use it can glorify God. You can be a tree of life to others by helpful and encouraging speech (Pr 15:4; Eph 4:29). The person who graciously teaches truth and wisdom to others is rare and precious (Neh 8:12; Luke 24:32; Acts 8:26-35). You can become this person by learning the book of Proverbs (Pr 1:1-4; 22:17-21).

Is it easy to change your speech habits? It is easier to train a cobra to sip milk from a bowl and purr on your lap (Jas 3:1-12). But God gave you Proverbs. Guard your speech. Cut your words in half. Think before you speak. Rule your spirit. Love graciousness. Make every word helpful and kind. Despise harshness. Hate talebearing. Purify your thoughts. Reject foolish indiscretions. Work harder at listening. Build others up.

Does your conscience grieve you when you speak foolishly? It should! It does, if you are a good man with an active conscience. But what will you feel in the Day of Judgment, when you must give an account for every idle word to the Lord of glory (Matt 12:34-37)? No wonder Isaiah cried out in grief about his unclean speech in God’s presence (Is 6:1-7). You can have rejoicing in yourself, regardless of what others think, by good speech (Gal 6:4). You can be satisfied and filled by wise and virtuous speech. God bless your efforts.

We have to accept whatever comes our way when it is the result of what we have said, good or bad.

The consequences of one’s words should produce satisfaction and fulfillment.


We see that hurt feelings between physical brothers and between close friends are much harder to overcome than to go to war and take a city. They won’t forget it. They have their guard up to any reconciliation you try to make.

There are no feuds as difficult to resolve as those with relatives; no barriers are so hard to bring down. Hence, great care should be taken to avoid such conflicts.

The Bible says that if we expect to be forgiven of God, we must forgive our brother. In fact, we are to forgive them as many times as they ask us. Over and over again, the Bible says 70 times 7. If your brother asks you to forgive, you must forgive.


To be joyful is to be ready to greet others with a welcome, a word of encouragement, an enthusiasm for the task at hand, and a positive outlook on the future.  Such people are as welcome as pain-relieving medicine. 


While there is something to be said for having big dreams, this proverb points out the folly of chasing fantasies (having eyes that wander to “the ends of the earth,” see 12:11).  How much better to align your goals with God’s, being the kind of person, he wants you to be! Such goals (wisdom, honesty, patience, love) may not seem exciting, but they will determine your eternal future.  Take time to think about your dreams and goals, and make sure they cover the really important areas of life. 


This “scoundrel” literally plots evil for his neighbor and his speech is incendiary.

This, if done by a woman, would be called malicious gossip. The evil this man is telling burns and destroys those he is talking about. He is a false witness, stirring up strife with just an evil tongue.


Most people work to buy food for their table. If a person gets hungry enough, some of the people who do not like to work will go to work just to eat. Hunger makes us work to satisfy that hunger.

This is just saying, Labor is hard and often grievous, but necessary, even for the lazy.


 One of the most dangerous things a man can do is try to do whatever feels good to him. This is the call of the flesh. The flesh life is a life of sin and destruction.

Both the narrow gate and the wide gate are assumed to provide the entrance to God’s kingdom. Two ways are offered to people. The narrow gate is by faith, only through Christ, constricted and precise. It represents true salvation in God’s way that lead to life eternal. The wide gate includes all religions of works and self-righteousness, with no single way, but it leads to hell, not heaven.