Posts Tagged ‘faithful men’


Under Gods Command 

Proverbs 25:13 Like the coolness of snow at harvest time is a trustworthy messenger to those who send him, he refreshes the spirit of his masters. 

Are you a breath of fresh air to all who trust you? Do you refresh the spirits of those who depend on you, like a cool drink on a hot fall day? Are you especially a source of joy to your employer? Faithfulness is a great thing, but it is a rare thing today. There are people trusting you and depending on you, and you are a relief and pleasure to them based on the degree of your faithfulness. The lesson of the proverb is the joy created by a faithful man.

Harvest occurred in the fall in Israel. After a hot summer and all the hard work of bringing a harvest into the barns and garners, the reapers, threshers, and other workers were parched and weary. The arrival of cool weather was a wonderful relief and pleasure, and so was a drink cooled by snow preserved from nearby mountains (Pr 25:25). Snow itself in harvest was not good; it was the cool weather or cooling effect of snow that was good. Solomon used this refreshing effect of cool weather or a cool drink for his simile.

Solomon used a messenger, or ambassador, for the lesson, though it applies to all jobs and duties. Rather than working under constant supervision, a messenger would be sent with news, covenants, or ultimatums to other places. It would be easy to delay departure, linger on the way, get sidetracked, forget details of the message, present it in the wrong way, say more than needed, misperceive the response, or fail in other ways (Pr 13:17).

Faithfulness is a great measure of a man’s character (Pr 11:13; 14:5; 27:6; 28:20). Most men claim to be faithful. Just read their resumes or listen to them talk! But there are only a few truly faithful men in any generation (Pr 20:6). A faithful man meticulously fulfills every duty to equal or exceed the expectations of those trusting or depending on him.

How faithful are you? Are you early to work and appointments? Are you known for punctuality? Do you pace yourself on projects? Do you procrastinate? Do you always hit deadlines? Are you easily sidetracked? Are you distracted quickly? Do you always finish projects? Do you get the details others need? Are you a great communicator so that all parties know all that is needed? Are your quality and quantity greater than expected?

Faithful men are rare. You can separate yourself from the crowd by faithfulness in your assignments (Pr 22:29; Luke 2:52). Do your duties in such a way that those trusting you and depending on you are filled with excitement at your outstanding performance. And this applies from President of the United States to being a great student in kindergarten!

God’s messengers should be the most faithful men. Only very faithful men tested by real duties should ever be ordained (I Tim 3:1-7). He should be the most diligent and faithful man in the church and focused on his God-given duties without distraction (Phil 2:19-22; I Tim 4:12-16; II Tim 2:3-4; Titus 1:5-11). It is a disgusting shame when the ministry is referred to as a “nonprofit profession” due to the dereliction of duty of most ministers.

The rest of your life begins now. Who is trusting you and depending on you that needs a refreshing drink of cool water or the relief of a cool breeze? Get to your duties and fulfill each one better than expected. Child, make your bed and clean your room perfectly. Wife, have a real meal for your family tonight. Husband, do not relax or sleep tonight without training your family. Mr. President, provide fully for our national success.


Under Gods Command

Proverbs 24:28 Do not testify against your neighbor without cause, or use your lips to deceive. 

You can hurt others by words. Or you can protect them by guarding your speech. It is easy to harm another person by gossip or slander. By hurting his reputation or testimony, you may inflict great pain or disadvantage on him. Part of godliness and wisdom is to rule your mouth, so you do not injure another person through malice or indiscretion.

Legal situations occur where you might be called as a witness for an accident, crime, or a person’s character. Your duty before God and men is to not testify against anyone without cause – there must be a righteous reason to disclose anything about another person, especially something negative. And you should never lie about him, which is bearing false witness, the ninth commandment of God’s ten to Moses (Ex 20:1-17).

Who is your neighbor? Your neighbor intends many more than just the few who live near you. It includes anyone you meet during your life, even those you might dislike and consider enemies by culture or race (Luke 10:29-37). It includes fellow employees, church members, relatives, fellow students, citizens, your doctor’s staff, and all like them.

A call to court as a witness is rare, but supervisors or managers asking you about fellow employees is not. Are you ready for such an event? You should tell only the truth needed, if confronted. But you should never use the opportunity to damage another employee to advance yourself, either with true events or lies. Solomon condemned it (Pr 30:10).

Never tell negative things about another person, unless necessary for some authority to rightly exercise their office. Even if events are true, it is wrong to spread secrets to others, for you damage their reputation, which can be like murder (Pr 18:8,21; 26:22). What some call gossip – the Bible condemns as sins of backbiting, talebearing, and whispering.

If you know private information about a person, keep it to yourself. Private things you know about others are secrets. Talebearers go around revealing secrets, but faithful men conceal them (Pr 11:13; 20:19). Are you a talebearer or faithful? Talebearers are very destructive (Pr 18:8; 26:20,22). God hates them and their sin (Pr 6:16-19; Lev 19:16).

This sin of talebearing, or tattling (I Tim 5:13), which some call gossip, is backbiting in the Bible. It is backbiting, for you bite a person in the back when you tell secrets about them in their absence (Pr 25:23; Rom 1:30; II Cor 12:20). Faithful men protect those not present by avoiding critical or negative speech about them (Ps 15:3; Pr 25:23).

Talking about others is also called whispering in the Bible, for it is the private sharing of secrets with others through hushed conversation or insinuation (Rom 1:29; II Cor 12:20). Whispering is destructive, as it turns men’s minds against even their friends (Pr 16:28; 17:9). Faithful men are protective and kind – they hate whispering and choose praise instead. They love their neighbors, which is the second greatest commandment of all.

Thus far, the lesson forbids speaking against your neighbor without a good reason. Even true events should be kept secret unless you must reveal them for a righteous cause (Matt 5:22). Telling the truth that hurts a reputation is talebearing, backbiting, and whispering. Though such sins are ignored due to the moral decline everywhere, you can despise them.

But the proverb here also condemns deceiving speech. This is slander – telling lies to get another person in trouble or to damage their character. This is bearing false witness, for you deceive and lie to injure him. Fools slander others (Pr 10:18; 25:18). God will punish false witnesses (Pr 19:5,9; 21:28). Good men will not slander (Pr 14:5; I Tim 3:11).

As the next proverb indicates (Pr 24:29), revenge should never be part of conversation about others. You must not reveal secrets about them or slander them by lies, even if they have mistreated you in the past. God will repay them, if they have wronged you, and He commands you to leave the matter to Him (Lev 19:18; Rom 12:17-21). He will repay.

Though not included here directly, flattery is also sinful speech that harms others, for it feigns and pretends either affection or praise for deceitful purposes. Whores use it to seduce young men (Pr 2:16; 5:3; 6:24; 7:5). It also is destructive (Pr 20:19; 26:28; 29:5). It is another form of lying and bearing false witness, for the praise is not sincere at all.

Consider the proverb’s wisdom! Your tongue – your words – can cut and hurt others, or they can be health and joy (Pr 12:18; 10:20-21; 16:24). God hears or reads your every word, knowing all the intents of your heart, so beware (Ps 139:4; Pr 18:21). It has been well said, if you cannot say something nice about another person, then say nothing at all!

Since men sin so many ways with their mouths, what will you do to stop talkers from injuring others? You should get angry against backbiters and cut them off from their violent game (Pr 25:23). Since men often lie to either injure or seduce, do not be affected by everything you hear, whether against you (Eccl 7:21-22) or for you (Pr 26:24-25).

Words come from the heart, so think only kindly about others, and then only kind words will pass your lips (Luke 6:45). Keep your heart diligently toward this goal (Pr 4:23). Always tell the truth (Pr 12:19,22). Only be critical when necessary for those in authority or for the profit of the hearer or the named (Pr 21:28; 29:24; 9:8; II Tim 4:14-15).

There is one witness always faithful and true and named accordingly (Rev 1:5; 3:14; 19:11). In a day very soon, Jesus Christ will be the only advocate or mediator before God the Judge of all (I Tim 2:5; Rev 20:11-15). He will tell the truth – fully and honestly. He will condemn the wicked (Matt 7:21-23). He will justify the righteous (Heb 2:10-13). Do you know Him? Or much more importantly, does He know you (Gal 4:9; II Tim 2:19)?


Under Gods Command

Proverbs 13:17 A wicked messenger falls into trouble, but a trustworthy envoy brings healing. 

Faithfulness and integrity are great character traits. You should have them yourself, and you should only associate with those who have them. When others trust you or depend on you, it is your duty and privilege to fulfill their desires and needs as perfectly as possible. This is noble performance that brings God’s approval and blessing and man’s as well.

Faithfulness and integrity are shown here by a messenger or ambassador. Wicked men get in trouble – they are easily waylaid by foolish distractions or pressure to compromise – they are not trustworthy or reliable. A faithful man brings prosperity to those trusting him, for he finishes the job as desired and expected. How often do you get waylaid?

It is a foolish sin to betray the confidence and trust of those who give you an assignment. The prosperous functioning of any society depends on men discharging their duties with diligence and honesty. Wicked men get diverted and fail their commitments. But faithful men make sure they complete the job, and they are a precious benefit to all concerned.

If you send a sluggard to do a job, his laziness will irritate you. Solomon wrote, “As vinegar to the teeth, and as smoke to the eyes, so is the sluggard to them that send him” (Pr 10:26). If you send a fool, you beg for damage. Solomon also wrote, “He that sendeth a message by the hand of a fool cutteth off the feet, and drinketh damage” (Pr 26:6).

Faithful men bring prosperity to deals. They are health to the transaction, rather than the mischief of wicked messengers. Confidence in knowing a man will finish a job right is a blessing. Solomon wrote, “As the cold of snow in the time of harvest, so is a faithful messenger to them that send him: for he refresheth the soul of his masters” (Pr 25:13).

Before email, telephones, and mail, messages were sent from individuals and nations by couriers and ambassadors. Wicked men did not take it seriously, and they would not deliver the message accurately or on time. They would fall into mischief on the way, distracted or diverted by temptations. Faithful ambassadors could be counted on to get the message conveyed accurately and on time. Private and national prosperity were served.

God’s saints should have impeccable reputations before the world, as did Joseph and Daniel (Gen 41:38-40; Dan 6:1-5; I Tim 6:1; Titus 2:9-10). When given an assignment, they should seek to exceed every expectation in keeping it (Pr 22:29; Rom 12:11; Ep 6:5-9). Does everyone know you are always faithful in any assignment or duty? Anything less than total trust in you is not good enough. Start today to be faithful with integrity.

Do you think about those trusting you? Do you fall into mischief, or do you bring them health? Your professional duties are important, but do not forget your parents and others depending on you. Carefully consider your spouse, children, neighbors, church members, etc. Regardless of whether they detailed their trust or not, do you faithfully serve them?

Since God chose communication by a messenger or ambassador for this proverb, consider the importance of correct communication. Do you confuse facts, embellish events, or exaggerate situations. Do you communicate as promptly and thoroughly as you should? Or do others have to chase you down to get what they needed? Do you take the time to be detailed and orderly in communication so there is no misunderstanding?

God chose preaching to send truth to men. Most preachers are wicked messengers, who fall into mischief and do not teach His Word accurately. There were many, even in Paul’s day, which corrupted the Word of God (II Cor 2:17; 11:3-4,13-15; Phil 3:18-19; I Jn 4:1). And this evil trend was going to get worse in the last days (I Tim 4:1-3; II Tim 3:6-7; 4:3-4; II Pet 2:1-2). Timothy was rare, having Paul’s concern for the churches (Phil 2:19-21).

Ministers must be ordained cautiously (I Tim 3:1-13; 5:22). They must be faithful men (I Cor 4:1-2; II Tim 2:2; Titus 1:6-11), who will not be distracted with this world (II Tim 2:4). They must give themselves wholly to their work (I Tim 4:13-16). They must handle the Scriptures honestly (II Cor 4:2) and with much study (II Tim 2:15). When churches have faithful ambassadors, they will have spiritual health (Neh 8:1-12; I Tim 4:15-16).

You must find a minister faithful to his calling by Jesus Christ (I Tim 3:1-7; 4:13-16; II Tim 2:1-7; I Pet 5:1-4; etc., etc.). Elihu, the only man understanding Job’s situation, said of such rare men, “If there be a messenger with him, an interpreter, one among a thousand, to shew unto man his uprightness: Then he is gracious unto him, and saith, Deliver him from going down to the pit: I have found a ransom” (Job 33:23-24). Amen!

Paul was the greatest gospel messenger and ambassador, for nothing moved him from his ordained calling as the apostle to the Gentiles, and he was more diligent than his peers (Acts 20:24; I Cor 15:10). He could say at the end of his life, “I have fought a good fight, I have finished my course, I have kept the faith” (II Tim 4:7). Are you thankful for the health he brought? If you are a Gentile believer, you should be thankful (Rom 15:15-21).

The most faithful messenger and ambassador is the Lord Jesus Christ. He told God His Father in heaven before dying, “I have glorified thee on the earth: I have finished the work which thou gavest me to do” (John 17:4). What if He had fallen into mischief in the desert or Gethsemane (Matt 4:1-11; 26:36-46)? But He brought eternal health to His elect children by complete faithfulness, even the death of the cross (Phil 2:5-11; Heb 3:1-6).