Posts Tagged ‘power’


Under Gods Command

 Proverbs 25:6-7 Do not exalt yourself in the King’s presence and do not claim a place among great men, (7) it is better for him to say to you, “Come up here,” than for him to humiliate you before a nobleman.

Jesus made this proverb into a parable

We should not seek honor for ourselves. It is better to quietly and faithfully accomplish the work God has given us to do. As others notice the quality of our lives, then they will draw attention to us.

When he noticed how the guests picked the places of honor at the table he told them this parable:

Luke 14:7-11 When someone invites you to a wedding feast, do not take the place of honor, for a person more distinguished than you may have been invited. If so the host who invited both of you will come and say to you, ‘Give this person your seat.’ Then, humiliated, you will have to take the least important place. But when you are invited, take the lowest place, so that when your host comes, he will say to you, ‘Friend, move up to a better place.’ Then you will be honored in the presence of all the other guests. For all those who exalt themselves will be humbled, and those who humble themselves will be exalted.”

14:7–14 Jesus taught two lessons here. First, he spoke to the guests, telling them not to seek places of honor. Service is more important in God’s kingdom than status. Second, he told the host not to be exclusive about whom he invites. God opens his kingdom to everyone.

14:11 How can we humble ourselves? Some people try to give the appearance of humility in order to manipulate others. Others think that humility means putting themselves down. Truly humble people compare themselves only with Christ, realize their sinfulness, and understand their limitations. On the other hand, they also recognize their gifts and strengths and are willing to use them as Christ directs. Humility is not self-degradation; it is realistic assessment and commitment to serve.

Jesus advised people not to rush for the best places at a feast. People today are just as eager to raise their social status, whether by being with the right people, dressing for success, or driving the right car.

Lets Bring it Home: Whom do you try to impress? Rather than aiming for prestige, look for a place where you can serve. If God wants you to serve on a wider scale, he will invite you to take a higher place.


Under Gods Command

PAUL ADDRESSES CHURCH PROBLEMS (1:1-6:20)

1 Corinthians 02:09 However, as it is written: “No eye has seen, no ear has heard, no mind has conceived what God has prepared for those who love him”

We cannot imagine all that god has in store for us, both in this life and for eternity. He will create a new heaven and a new earth (Isaiah 65:17; Revelation 21:1), and we will live with him forever. Until then, his Holy Spirit comforts and guides us.

Lets Bring it Home: Knowing the wonderful and eternal future that awaits us gives us hope and courage to press on in this life, to endure hardship, and to avoid giving in to temptation. This world is not all there is. The best is yet to come.


Under Gods Command

Proverbs 18:20 From the fruit of his mouth a man’s stomach is filled: with the harvest from his lips he is satisfied. 

Do you want to be happy and successful? You can be! Here is wisdom to find fulfillment and peace in life: learn to talk better (Pr 18:21). The proverb has many figures of speech, but the lesson is simple. If you will improve your speaking, you will be blessed in many ways by God, by others, and even by your own soul (Pr 14:14). Grasp this wisdom!

Your belly here is your heart, soul, spirit, and conscience (Pr 13:25; 18:8; 20:27,30). They are fulfilled and satisfied, when you speak well (Pr 15:23). The fruit of your mouth is gracious and wise words, which is the good trait of speaking correctly (Pr 16:13; 22:11; 24:26; 25:11). You can give yourself pleasure by noble speech. Kind and good words help listeners for sure, but they also bring rewards to the speaker (Pr 12:14; 13:2).

The increase of your lips in this proverb is the improvement that you make to your speech by learning the rules of wisdom for the tongue and lips (Pr 15:28; 16:23). Solomon had much to say on this subject, and you can increase the sweetness and value of your speech by ruling your words for the glory of God and profit of man. This increase, like the fruit in the first clause, will bring blessing, honor, and riches into your life.

How many times have you later said to yourself, “Why did I say that?” If you have a conscience (all good men have strong consciences), then you have grieved for foolish or hurtful words you let escape from your mouth. It is this frustrating pain in life that you can eliminate by learning gracious speech. Solomon knew the chance of sin increased with much speaking, so he recommended fewer words (Pr 10:19; 17:27-28; Eccl 5:1-3). This saying is wise: If you cannot say anything kind and helpful, then say nothing at all.

How many times have others said, “Why did she say that?” Have you left others bleeding from the piercing of the sword in your mouth (Pr 12:18)? Your tongue is for the health and wealth of others, but you often leave them angered, grieving, or confused. Sometimes they tell you about it; most of the time they just suffer in silence. When you find out the pain and damage you have caused, it is a burden on your soul. It is your wisdom and honor to learn words that encourage and instruct others (Pr 10:20-21; 16:24).

God gave you a tongue for more than swallowing food. He named it your glory (Ps 30:12; 108:1). By proper use it can glorify God. You can be a tree of life to others by helpful and encouraging speech (Pr 15:4; Eph 4:29). The person who graciously teaches truth and wisdom to others is rare and precious (Neh 8:12; Luke 24:32; Acts 8:26-35). You can become this person by learning the book of Proverbs (Pr 1:1-4; 22:17-21).

Is it easy to change your speech habits? It is easier to train a cobra to sip milk from a bowl and purr on your lap (Jas 3:1-12). But God gave you Proverbs. Guard your speech. Cut your words in half. Think before you speak. Rule your spirit. Love graciousness. Make every word helpful and kind. Despise harshness. Hate talebearing. Purify your thoughts. Reject foolish indiscretions. Work harder at listening. Build others up.

Does your conscience grieve you when you speak foolishly? It should! It does, if you are a good man with an active conscience. But what will you feel in the Day of Judgment, when you must give an account for every idle word to the Lord of glory (Matt 12:34-37)? No wonder Isaiah cried out in grief about his unclean speech in God’s presence (Is 6:1-7). You can have rejoicing in yourself, regardless of what others think, by good speech (Gal 6:4). You can be satisfied and filled by wise and virtuous speech. God bless your efforts.


Under Gods Command

Good Pride and Bad Pride

Proverbs 11:02 When pride comes, then comes disgrace, but with humility comes wisdom.

Galatians 6:4-5 Each one should test his own actions. Then he can take pride in himself, without comparing himself to somebody else, for each one should carry his own load.

There are two kinds of pride.
One is the opposite of humility; it is very bad. The other is the opposite of shame; it is very good.
• The kind of pride that is the opposite of humility leaves God and other circumstances out of our successes. It claims that whatever we have achieved, we have achieved by our own virtue. The essence of this kind of pride is self-centeredness and selfishness and it is condemned by Scripture. This does not mean, however, that the Bible is opposed to the self. The self is one of God’s good creations; selfishness is worshiping the creation rather than the creator. Bad pride is the kind of selfishness that always wants to be center stage that takes all the credit, that leaves God out, that gives no thanks to other people that goes it alone. It is the opposite of what God desires for us.
• The kind of pride that is the opposite of shame has to do with a job well done, with excellence, with striving for the best, with rising above mediocrity. In a Christian, this kind of pride attempts to give of its best to the Master.

People who misunderstand the difference between the two kinds of pride may have a misimpression of the Christian faith. Christianity is not opposed to excellence. It is not opposed to putting forth your best effort, excelling, and achieving. No, it is only opposed to a person’s thinking he can excel without ‘God’s help.
• Selfish pride is the opposite of thankfulness and gratitude. It show no gratitude to God for a healthy body, a healthy mind, good parents, a good national heritage, a good diet, and a thousand other blessing over which the person has no control. A person filled with selfish pride thinks he has created himself through his own efforts….. The other kind of pride doesn’t finish playing a solo and say it was nothing. It is not unable to accept a compliment.
• The pride that is opposite to shame can say thank you and give credit where credit is due. It can thank God for his gifts and at the same time acknowledge good work when it is done. The person who can accept a compliment is not arrogant. He knows where his dexterous fingers come from, who gave him his mind and his sense of rhythm.

Have you been successful? Do people praise your achievements? Give credit to God in thankful prayer for each gift he has given you.

Please remember that these emails are going to over 100 people. I used BCC to keep your email address private. I just want to share my own personal walk with you, and yes, please hold me accountable for my actions. I love you all and there is nothing that you can do about it.


Under Gods Command
Proverbs 18.24 – A man of many companions may come to ruin, but here is a friend who sticks closer than a brother.

Loneliness is everywhere-many people feel cut off and alienated from others. Being in a crowd just makes people more aware of their isolation. We all need friends who will stick close, listen, care and offer help when it is needed-in good times and bad. It is better to have one such friend than dozens of superficial acquaintances. Instead of wishing you could find a true friend, seek to become one. There are people who need your friendship. Ask God to reveal them to you, and then take on the challenge of being a true friend.


Under Gods Command

Proverbs 14:09 Fool mock at making amends for sin, but goodwill is found among the upright.

How rarely we find goodwill around us today. Angry drivers scowl at each other in the streets. People fight to be first in line. Disgruntled employers and employees both demand their rights. But the common bond of God’s people should be goodwill. Those with goodwill think the best of others and assume that others have good motives and intend to do what is right. When someone crosses you, and you feel your blood pressure rising, ask yourself, “How can I show goodwill to this person?”


Under Gods Command

Lamentations 1:9 – Her filthiness clung to her skirts; she did not consider her future.  Her fall was astounding; there was none to comfort her.  “Look, O LORD, on my affliction, for the enemy has triumphed.”

 The warning was loud and clear: If Judah played with fire, its people would get burned.  Jerusalem foolishly took a chance and lost, refusing to believe that immoral living brings God’s punishment.  The ultimate consequence of sin is punishment (Romans 6:23).  We can choose to ignore God’s warnings, but as surely as judgment came upon Jerusalem, so will it come upon those who defy God.  Are you listening to God’s Word? Are you obeying it? Obedience is a sure sign of your love for God.